Sickert & The Ripper Crimes
The 1888 Ripper Murders
and the artist
Walter Richard Sickert
Jean Overton Fuller


Format: Softcover
ISBN: 1869928687
£12.99/US$26
Subjects: Art/Ripperology/True Crime.

In the autumn of 1888, London women lived under the shadow of the Ripper murders-killings perhaps unmatched in their sadistic brutality.

Sickert & The Ripper Crimes derives from the unsuspected testimony of the woman who had particular reason to fear for her life.

Florence Pash, friend and colleague of the artist Walter Sickert and herself an artist, confided to the author’s mother when in her late eighties, a terrible story that she had kept even from those closest to her.

‘timely and welcome…remains a curious and important book’
– Paul Begg in Ripperologist, April 2002

*Ripperologist, The Journal of Jack The Ripper, East End and Victorian Studies is available in electronic format, on subscription / Email contact@ripperologist.biz

JEAN OVERTON FULLER
OBITUARY

The author, biographer and Theosophist Jean Overton Fuller was born on 7th March 1915, of Captain John Henry Fuller and the artist Violet Overton Fuller. The posthumous child of her father, who was killed in East Africa in the winter of 1914, her mother brought the young Jean up, with an entourage of intellectuals and artists.

Jean Overton Fuller is known in the field of Ripperology for her book Sickert and the Ripper Crimes. A study of the enormously talented Edwardian painter Walter Richard Sickert, in which, using her artist eye she scrutinises the paintings he produced for clues about the 1888 Ripper murders. Sickert found thrill and inspiration in the music halls, and the murky regions of the demi-monde and its inhabitants. The man was an enigma, his obsession with the Ripper murders, and the atmosphere of impending gory death, with the nudity, garishness, the strong scarlet hues, and the threatening shadows depicted so disturbingly in The Camden Town Murder series of his paintings, have raised questions and suspicion about the nature of Sickert’s fascination.

Jean, through her mother, was a contemporary link to these events, and with Sickert and the Ripper Crimes had generated a considerable amount of interest from the public as well from among her fellow writers, such as for instance the American best-selling author Patricia Cornwell and her contribution to the subject with her Portrait of A Killer: Jack The Ripper, Case Closed.

Paul Begg and Adam Wood of Ripperologist had invited Jean Overton Fuller to speak at the 2003 Ripper Conference in Liverpool. Mogg drove from Oxford to Wymington, a small locality in Northamptonshire to collect Jean en route to the Conference. This weekend in August was one of the hottest in the year. After the nightmare journey of the A5 to Liverpool with cars slowly moving head to tail, they were rewarded and arrived at the gigantic and labyrinthine Britannia Adelphi Hotel, a venue specially chosen for this Conference because of its Ripper connection. Jean greatly enjoyed this event and the very good and erudite company of the international fraternity of Ripperologists. The late Jeremy Beadle was the Master of Ceremony and introduced Jean to the audience, and she came alight on stage and spoke entertainingly for about half an hour without notes.

This was Jean’s penultimate public engagement. The last being Jean’s talk on C.W. Leadbeater, at the 2005 Theosophical History Conference in London.

Jean was hard of hearing which at times made her appear distant. She was a great English eccentric, humorous, kind, highly intelligent with a far ranging culture. She was extraordinary.

Her friends and those who met her will remember her with great warmth and affection. When you met Jean, even though the age gap, there was no sense of an age barrier. She was a rare soul.

Dear Jean rest in Peace and enjoy Devachan with your loved ones who departed before.

‘Om Mani Padme Om, the Sunrise comes!
The dewdrop slips into the shining sea!’
(From The Light of Asia by Sir Edwin Arnold)

Jean Overton Fuller: Author, Astrologer, Biographer, Theosophist, Ripperologist.
Born London, 7th March 1915 – Died Kettering, Wednesday 8th April 2009.

***************************************************************************************************************

LINKS & RESOURCES FOR CRIME & RIPPEROLOGY SPECIALISTS

Featuring : True Crime & Ripperology Conferences, Conventions, Seminars, Forums, Societies, Crime Writers Guilds, Journals, Books, Media, Archives, Museums, Tours, Walks.

*****************************************************************************************************************

www.laybooks.com
LORETTA LAY
– is a Specialist Detective Fiction and True Crime Bookdealer and a leading authority on Jack The Ripper.

*****

www.murderone.co.uk/
MURDER ONE UK
– Murder One UK is an online, mail order only bookseller and a successor to the famous Murder One bookshop that traded in the heart of Charing Cross Road for over twenty years.

*****

www.casebook.org
CASEBOOK
– is the Web’s largest public Jack The Ripper Archive.

*****

www.jtrforums.com
JACK THE RIPPER FORUMS
– The place to be for all things Ripper.

*****

www.ripperologist.com
RIPPEROLOGIST

– The Journal of Jack The Ripper, East End and Victorian Studies, is available in electronic format on subscription /Email contact@ripperologist.biz

*****

www.karyom.com
THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS
– Karyo Magellan’s website dedicated to Jack The Ripper.

*****

www.whitechapelsociety.com
THE WHITECHAPEL SOCIETY 1888
– organize conferences, lectures, moots and tours on Jack The Ripper.

*****

www.met.police.uk/history/ripper.htm
METROPOLITAN POLICE CRIME MUSEUM

*****

http://www.jacktheripperwalk.com/
JACK THE RIPPER WALK

*****

http://www.thejacktherippertour.com/
THE JACK THE RIPPER TOUR

*****

http://www.jack-the-ripper-tour.com/
JACK THE RIPPER TOUR

*****

www.crimeandinvestigation.co.uk
CRIME & INVESTIGATION NETWORK

*****

www.mysterywriters.org
MYSTERY WRITERS of AMERICA

*****

www.thedaggers.co.uk
CRIME WRITERS ASSOCIATION
– The Daggers Awards

*****

RIPPER STREET / BBC series (DVDs)

– Haunted by the failure to catch Londonʼs most evil killer, Jack the Ripper, Inspector Edmund Reid (Matthew Macfadyen) now heads up the notorious H Division – the toughest police district in the East End. Charged with keeping order in the blood-stained streets of Whitechapel, Reid and his men fi nd themselves fi ghting to uphold justice and the rule of law; but always in the background lurks the fear of the Ripper – is he back for another reign of terror.

The shadow of the Ripper is still felt in the neighbourhood by the vigilantes, the sensation-seeking newspaper hacks and the men who hunted – and failed to find – the notorious murderer. It seems that even though the notorious killer has disappeared, there are plenty more willing to stain the streets of Whitechapel with their victims’ blood…

*****

The Magical Dilemma
of Victor Neuburg
Jean Overton Fuller

To mark the centenary of Dylan Thomas, here’s an extract from JOF’s book that narrates her first meeting with the soon to be famous poet:

The Magical Dilemma of Victor Neiburg
978-1869928-797

Dylan1936


Format; Softcover
ISBN:
£12.99/US$24
Subjects: Biography/Aleister Crowley/Thelema/Magick.

“We agreed to Zoists”: Dylan Thomas & the Occultist Victor Neuburg (Aleister Crowley’s lover & collaborator)

“We agreed to Zoists.

Runia wanted us to have badges, ‘so that one Zoist can recognize another, if you meet outside, or if we have provincial centres.’

There was a murmur of dissent. Some of us felt this thing was getting inflated. And we didn’t want badges. We weren’t boy scouts; just a few people who wanted to come here and sit and talk to each other on Saturday evenings.

‘All right, no badges,’ she said. ‘But it is agreed we have a name?’

It was agreed but there was no enthusiasm for the name, our feeling being for the informal. Before we left Runia made us cups of tea.

When eventually we broke up, and I stood again in the road outside, I felt I could tell my mother I had been among distinguished people. But the truth was I felt something else as well. I felt I had been in ancient Egypt and for this feeling I could find no explanation.

Not all of those who had been present on the first evening returned the following Saturday, but as I attended every week I began to know the regulars. Arriving soon after 8 (dinner at the hotel where my mother and I lived, was at 7, so it was a rush), I always found a certain number of people there already, though there was usually some time to wait until Vicky and Runia came from the inner room. It was in this waiting time that I had to find my feet, as it were among the other young ones. Nobody was ever introduced at Vicky’s. One just found out for oneself. I did not find the young men easy although they made efforts to draw me into the circle, for they assumed an acquaintance with modern poetry and political authors greater than I possessed; I could not always follow their allusions, and I had the feeling they all participated in a form of culture slightly strange to me. I was therefore grateful when a good looking young man, quiet mannered and of a more ordinarily civilized demeanour, settled himself beside me and asked, simply, ‘How did you come to Vicky’s?’

I told him about the circular letter I had received. He knew Geoffrey Lloyd had sent some out and asked, ‘What do you do when you’re not writing poems for Vicky? What’s your background, so to speak?’

I told him I had been on the stage since I was seventeen.
He said ‘Fancy our having an actress among us!’

‘What’s your name?’ I asked him.

‘William Thomas’, was what I first thought he said, but then he added, ‘It’s a special Welsh name.’
There could be nothing very special about William, and I puckered my brows.
‘You’ll never have heard it before,’ he said. ‘Nobody in England ever has. It should really be pronounced Wullam, in Welsh.’ Or was he saying ‘Dullan’?

‘It’s a special Welsh name,’ he repeated. ‘I shall have to spell it for you. D-Y-L-A-N. In Wales, it’s pronounced Dullan. But I’d been corresponding with Vicky for some time before I came to London, and when I arrived I found he had been calling me Dillan, in his mind. I thought if Vicky didn’t know how to pronounce it nobody in England would, so I decided to take it as the standard English pronunciation of my name. Otherwise I’d spend all my time telling people it was Dull and not Dill, and I think perhaps Dillan sounds more elegant than Dullan. Only Idris objects and thinks it’s frightfully fancy! Because he’s Welsh, too, and he knows! but now I’m getting even Idris trained to call me Dillan, though it’s under protest!’
‘What part of Wales do you come from?’ I said.

‘Oh, I only come from a small town. Swansea.’

Whereas I had previously felt myself to be the most naive member of a group otherwise composed of sophisticated, bohemian intellectuals, I now felt I had, vis-à-vis Dylan Thomas, at any rate, an advantage in being a Londoner. ‘I should have thought Swansea was a large town,’ I said. ‘I was near there all last summer. If you had been to the theatre at Porthcawl you would have seen me on the stage!’

‘No, I’m afraid I didn’t’ he said. ‘What a pity!’

Giving the conversation a turn he did not expect, I said, ‘Have you ever been down a mine?’
‘No.’

‘I have!’ I explained triumphantly. ‘Near Crumlin. I once played a January date in the Rhondda. Or more exactly the Ebbw Vale.’ I told him how I had persuaded the men at a pit to take me down the shaft, and how, having arrived at the bottom, I was given a lamp to hold and escorted along a passage which had been hewed through the coal to a point where it became so low that one would have had to proceed on hands and knees. I was shown a fault seam, which I felt with my fingers.

‘You have seen something in Wales which I haven’t!’ said Dylan. He explained that his home was some distance from the mining regions. He described the part of Swansea where he lived, with a detail I cannot now recall, except that it sounded salubrious and agreeable. His father was Senior English Master at the Grammar School. ‘Living where I do one doesn’t really see anything of all that,’ he said, with reference to my allusion to the coal mining (and depressed) areas. ‘Idris comes from the Rhondda,’1 he said. ‘I haven’t been into those areas.’ As though he had been slightly shamed by my adventure, he added, ‘Perhaps I ought to have done.’

‘It’s because you live there that you wouldn’t think of it,’ I said. ‘When one is touring one feels one must see everything in case one never comes again. When I was sixteen, my mother and I made a tour of Italy, Pisa, Rome, Naples, Capri, and back through Perugia, Florence and Milan. We felt we had to go into everything, even the smallest church we passed on any street. We realized we had never “done” London half as thoroughly because we took it for granted.’

I have no ‘outrageous’ sayings of Dylan Thomas to record. His conversation with me was perfectly drawing-room and unexceptional. I remember him as a polite young man. Friendly, but not at all presuming.
He told me the origins of the circle of which I now formed part. ‘First one and then another of us found our way to Vicky’s through entering into correspondence with him or something like that, and so a circle grew up around Vicky. We’re all very fond of Vicky.’ He explained that, ‘always reading each other’s names in print we began to wonder what the ones whom we hadn’t seen were like.’ So they had had the idea ‘of sending out circulars to everybody who was a contributor. He thought it had brought in some interesting people. ‘Well, it has brought you!’ Perhaps one could name some kind of a regular thing of it. ‘The only thing I don’t like is the name Zoists!’ he said.

I laughed and said, ‘It does sound a bit like protozoa, zoophytes and zoids!’

Dylan pulled a funny face.

‘We’re always called “Vicky’s children”,’ said Dylan. ‘It’s a bit sentimental, but I don’t think we shall ever be called anything else.’

It had been at the back of my mind while he was speaking that his name, as he had spelled it out, was one which I had read in the Sunday Referee in a context more important than that of the weekly prizes. I had not taken the paper regularly before I joined the circle, or I would have known the whole build-up. I said, ‘Aren’t you the winner of a big prize? I believe you’re one of the distinguished people here!’
‘It was through Vicky and the Sunday Referee that a book of my poems has been published,’ he said. He explained that a prize was offered twice yearly, part of which consisted in the publication of the winner’s poems in book form. ‘The first was awarded to Pamela Hansford Johnson. She isn’t here tonight. I was given the second of them.’ He said that Vicky had helped him pick out what he thought were the best of the poems he had written.

‘What’s it called?’

‘Just 18 Poems. It was published just before Christmas, and I think it’s doing quite well.’ He added, ‘I’m very grateful to Vicky. It’s a big thing for me. One’s first book is the most difficult to get published. Everyone says so. Now that I have one book published, it should be easier to get the next accepted, perhaps by an ordinary firm.’

My sentiment for Vicky was already so strong that I was slightly shocked.

Dylan Thomas saw it. ‘Vicky doesn’t expect us to stay with him!’ he said. ‘This is a nursery school from which we are expected to go out into the world. When we can get published elsewhere nobody is more pleased than Vicky!’

Just then the moment for which we had been waiting arrived. The door from the inner part of the house opened and our hosts came out to join us.

Vicky came straight up to Dylan and me. I did not know which of us the distinction was meant for but it gave me joy. He stood by my chair, looking down on us beamingly, and said to Dylan, ‘You’re entertaining this little lady?’

Dylan said, ‘I’ve been telling her something of the history of the Poet’s Corner.’

*********************************

Laugharne,
Carmarthenshire,
Wales
19 June 1940
Dear Miss Fuller
I haven’t heard anything from Vicky and Runia for years, until about a fortnight ago.
Then Pamela Johnson wrote to tell me that Vicky had just died. I was very grieved to hear it; he was a sweet, wise man. Runia’s address is 84, Boundary Road, NW8. At least, I suppose she is still there. I wrote her a letter, but I haven’t had a reply yet; probably she’s too sad to write.
Yours sincerely
Dylan Thomas

——————————

Really two books in one. Firstly a record of one man’s extraordinary journey to magical enlightenment. Secondly the story of Aleister Crowley, the magus who summoned Neuburg to join him in the quest.

‘The book opens with the author’s entry into the group of young poets including Dylan Thomas and Pamela Hansford Johnson. They gather around Victor Newburg in 1935 when he is poetry editor of the Sunday Referee. Gradually the author becomes aware of his strange and sinister past, in which Neuburg was associated in magick with Aleister Crowley.

Contents: Beginnings / Mystic of the Agnostic Journal / Crowley and the Golden Dawn / Initiation / Magical Retirement / Equinox and Algeria / Rites of Eleusis / Triumph of Pan / Desert / Triangles / Moon Above the Tower / Templars and the Tradition of Sheikh El Djebel / Paris Working / The Sanctuary / Arcanum Arcanorum / Dylan Thomas

Reviews:

‘Those interested in Western occult history will welcome this revised and expanded edition of an important work first published in 1965.

Overton Fuller’s biography of Neuburg paints an intimate portrait of this complex character who was as much mystic as poet. A prominent figure in London’s literary bohemia in the 1930s, Neuburg encouraged such writers as Dylan Thomas, Pamela Hansford Johnson, Hugo Manning and many others, including Overton Fuller.

In his earlier days, Neuburg had been a disciple, magical partner and possibly even lover of Aleister Crowley during a period of ground-breaking magical experiments.

‘Vicky encouraged me as no one else has done,’ Dylan Thomas declared on hearing of Neuburg’s death. ‘He possessed many kinds of genius, and not the least was his genius for drawing to himself, by his wisdom, graveness, great humour and innocence, a feeling of trust and love, that won’t ever be forgotten.’ ‘ . . . there was a whiff of sulphur abroad, and all of us would have liked to know the truth of the Aleister Crowley’s legends, the truth of the witch-like baroness called Cremers, the abandonment of Neuburg in the desert.’

– Pamela Hansford Johnson

‘No dry biography this but an illuminating and compelling account of a multi-faceted personality who lived during an exciting period of occult and literary history. An absolute must-have!’
– (ME) In Prediction Magazine November 2005

Jean Overton Fuller

– Writer, Biographer, Artist, Poet, Mystic, Astrologer, Theosophist, Ripperologist

Jean Overton Fuller is no stranger to controversy. For more than half a century she has been exploding myths in a manner than has often lead to a complete reappraisal of the establishment view. The only child of Indian Army Officer Capt J H M Fuller and the artist Violet Overton Fuller, she holds a degree in English from London University. She had a brief career on the stage and knew Victor Neuberg, (magical partner of Aleister Crowley) and his circle in the mid 1930s.

During World War II she used her eagle eye to search for espionage in sensitive postal communications. She later made researches into the fate of her friend Noor-un-Nisa Inayat Khan and other British agents in France under German occupation.

Jean Overton Fuller’s acclaimed biography Noor-un-Nisa-Inayat Khan (Madeleine) was first published by Victor Gollancz in September 1952, and because of the enormous public empathy to the heroic life and death of beautiful Princess Noor, had run into fourth impression by November of the same year. Several subsequent editions followed, including a Pan paperback entitled Born For Sacrifice, and a new hardback edition by East-West Publications in 1988.

Miss Fuller joined the Theosophical Society in 1940, and is a former vice-president of the Astrological Lodge of London.  She was a regular contributor to the scholarly journal Theosophical History http://www.theohistory.org/ founded by Leslie Price and edited by Professor James Santucci.  Jean Overton Fuller also contributed letters for ”Alpheus”, Govert Schuller’s excellent Theosophical website for Esoteric History http://www.alpheus.org

Jean was also well liked and respected among Ripperologists and she spoke at The Jack The Ripper Conference. See Mandrake Ripperology section for Jean Overton Fuller
http://mandrake.uk.net/sickert-the-ripper-crimes-2/


Check out these very good websites about Jean Overton Fuller

http://www.angelfire.com/va/violetteszabo/overtonfuller.html

http://www.jeanovertonfuller.com/

http://www.rushdenheritage.co.uk/Villages/people/fuller-jean-overton.html

 

*********************************

CATS AND OTHER IMMORTALS
BY JEAN OVERTON FULLER
ISBN 0-903394-98-7 / Format: Large A4 hardback / Full colours illustrations /
Publisher: Fuller d’Arch Smith Ltd (1992)
Price: £10 / $20 / post and packaging not included / available from Mandrake of Oxford

[Jean Overton Fuller is the author of more than a dozen non-fiction books of very different character from this, and is also an artist. She studied at the Academie Julien in Paris, and paintings she exhibited at the Chelsea Art Society and elsewhere include a number of those of the cats and other immortals who figure in this story.]

*****

Driven to it- An autobiography
by Jean Overton Fuller
Published 2007 by Michael Russell
ISBN 978-0-85955-306-3 / Hardback / 376 pp /
Illustrated with previously unreleased photographs.
[‘Driven to it‘ is the long awaited autobiography by one of England’s rarest and most erudite writers. A must read for Jean Overton Fuller’s fans. She is a natural writer. And a true original.]THIS TITLE IN NOW OUT OF PRINT.

*****
Blavatsky and Her Teachers: An Investigative Biography
By Jean Overton Fuller
ISBN 0856921718 /  1989 / East/West Publishing / Hardback
[An elegantly written, well researched, profoundly insightful biography of the extraordinary Madame Blavatsky and a study of her works, by a respected Theosophical scholar.]

*****
Krishnamurti and The Wind:  An Integral Biography
By Jean Overton Fuller
ISBN 0722950187  / 2003 / TPH London / Hardback / Paperback
[Another must read for all students of Theosophical History.]

*****

OTHER BOOKS,  BIOGRAPHIES & STUDIES BY JEAN OVERTON FULLER

Noor-un-Nisa Inayat Khan (Madeleine)
The Starr Affair
Double Webs – Horoscope for a Double Agent
Shelley – A Biography
Swinburne – A Biography
The German Penetration of S O E
Sir Francis Bacon – A Biography
The Comte de Saint-Germain,
(Last Scion of the House of Rákóczy)
Blavatsky and Her Teachers – An Investigative Biography
Cats and Other Immortals
Déricourt, The Chequered Spy – A Biography
Krishnamurti and The Wind – An Integral Biography
Driven to it – An Autobiography

*****

MONOGRAPHS

*Joan Grant – Winged Pharaoh
*Cyril Scott and A Hidden School
[*can be purchased from the Theosophical History website.]

*****

POETRY

Carthage and the Midnight Sun
The Sun’s Cart
Silver Planet
Darun and Pitar
Gilby
Tintagel
Prophecy from Helen

*****

POETRY IN TRANSLATION

Shiva’s Dance (from the French of Helene Bouvard)
That the Gods May Remember
(from the French of Helene Bouvard)
The Prophet (from the Russian of Alexander Pushkin)

*****