Images of Set
Joan Ann Lansberry

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Images of Set
Joan Ann Lansberry
Format: Softcover
ISBN: 978-1-906958-21-3
£12.99/US$25
Subjects: Ancient Egypt/Egyptology

The god Set (aka Seth) has been much of a puzzle to Egyptologists. If we go with the attitude of later Egyptians, we find Set blamed for every misfortune that can befall humanity. However, if we go with the attitude of earlier times, in particular the Ramesside period, when Egypt was at its peak in prosperity, we find a completely different picture. For we find a god who was very much adored. Most of the surviving imagery is from that period, although even in Ptolemaic and Roman times we occasionally find a piece that was a part of worship and magical rites. Set was always seen as ‘Great of Power’, even when he was feared. Putting all his imagery together, placing it in chronological context, sheds new light on the Dark god.

“Joan Lansberry is a place where three roads meet: solid academic research, strong talent as a working artist, and a deep magical intuition for the magical current represented by Set. Her collection provides Keys to some doors long-unopened, and will prove invaluable to the modern Left Hand Path. I’ll be thumbing through this book for years to come.”

Don Webb
High Priest of Set (Emeritus)

www.joanannlansberry.com

Pan’s Road
(Fiction complement to
The Bull of Ombos)
Mogg Morgan


Pan’s Road
(Fiction complement to The Bull of Ombos)
Mogg Morgan
Format: Softcover
ISBN: 1869928-89x
£7.99/US$16
Subjects: Occult Fiction/Egyptian Magick/Ancient Egypt.

PAN’S ROAD
Fiction complement to THE BULL OF OMBOS

The ancient hungry stones of Coptos in Upper Egypt have soaked up the stories of the inhabitants along with their blood. When archaeologists unearth a magician’s box in the rubble of an ancient Egyptian tomb, it propels Jay into a supernatural journey across space and time. She merges with the mysterious Zenobia, a native of ancient Coptos. Zenobia and her family are fleeing from the advancing Roman armies that are returning to their Egyptian frontier bent on punishing its rebellious citizens. The only escape from the frying pan of Coptos is into the fire of the Eastern desert. Their journey on Pan’s Road is fraught with new dangers but also new possibilities, as the protagonists are led to the heart of an ancient mystery in the lost city of Ombos – Citadel of Seth, the Egyptian god of Chaos.

Gateway to Hell
Margaret Bingley
(Occult Fiction)


Gateway to Hell
Margaret Bingley
Format: Softcover
ISBN:
£9.99/US$18
Subjects: Occult Fiction/Egyptian Magick.

Child psychologist Nicola Grainger and her husband Howard have chosen to remain childless, but when Nicola’s sister and her husband are killed in a car accident in Egypt, Nicola feels duty bound to offer their young twin sons a home.

After their arrival, it quickly becomes clear that their upbringing in Egypt, their father’s country, has left them spoiled and difficult to handle. They also have the disconcerting ability to finish each other’s sentences and constantly answer to each other’s names. At times Nicola feels that they’re not two children at all, but in fact represent different aspects of one child.

As a child psychologist, Nicola knows that the boys need time to adjust to their new life, but she has failed to understand their ability to read the minds of people around them, playing on their most terrifying subconscious fears with horrific results.

In addition to these problems, Nicola finds that she is having to cope with the boys’ attachment to the handsome Sergei, a friend of their father’s in Egypt, who visits them regularly to provide a much needed link between their past life and their new one. Only Sergei truly understands these children, and only Sergei knows the truth about their past and what the future holds for them. As he draws Nicola into his magnetic web she is literally unable to get him out of her mind. To the astonishment of everyone, including herself, she abandons Howard and travels to Egypt with Sergei and her nephews. Once there, she is plunged into a world of dark eroticism and looming evil – the hidden, gaping gateway to hell.

The Bull of Ombos
Set and Egyptian Magick II
Mogg Morgan


The Bull of Ombos
Set & Egyptian Magick II
Mogg Morgan
Format: Softcover
ISBN:
£13.99/US$23
Subjects: Egyptian Magick.

Naqada is a sleepy little town in Upper Egypt, that gives its name to a crucial period in the prehistory of Egypt. In 1895, William Matthew Flinders Petrie, the ‘father’ of Egyptian archaeology, stumbled upon a necropolis, belonging to a very ancient city of several thousand inhabitants. With Petrie’s usual luck, he’d made yet another archaeological find of seismic proportions – not just an ancient city a quarter the size of Ur in Mesopotamia, a rare enough find, but the capital of the earliest state established in Egypt! Petrie’s fateful walk through the desert led him to a lost city, known to the Greeks as Ombos, the Citadel of Seth. Seth, the Hidden God, once ruled in this ancient place before it was abandoned to the sands of the desert. All this forbidden knowledge was quickly reburied in academic libraries, where its stunning magical secrets had lain, largely unrevealed, for more than a century – until now.

This book is for all Egyptophiles as well as anyone with an interest in the archaic roots of magick and the sabbatic craft.

Contents: Gold in the desert / Sethians and Osirians compared / Cannibalism /Temple of Seth / Seth’s Town / Seth as Bull of Ombos / Hathor / The names of Seth / Animals of Seth / Seth – the red ochre god / Seth and Horus / Opening the mouth / Seven / The Boat / Heka & Hekau / Magical activities / Cakes of Light / Magick as use and misuse of the funeral rite / Re-emergence of the Hidden God / Five useful Appendices / Extended bibliography /Glossary

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Reviews

“The Bull of Ombos is an important and ground-breaking work. The figure of Set(h) has been of significance within Western magic for quite some time, even if he (it?) has appeared as the more controversial form of Satan. While the Temple of Set and The Storm have pioneered research into Sethian magick, the works of Mogg Morgan stand alone as major contributions to this field. What I find most unique is that they combine the fastidiousness of an Egyptologist with the experience of a modern occultist. Certainly Morgan knows his stuff, from Tantra to the modern O.T.O. from pagan and Left Hand Path magick to the Golden Dawn and traditional folklore and customs, but at the same time he approaches the subject cautiously and with the skills of a scholar even a folklorist.

What he offers in this work is what could be best described as a reconstruction of pre-dynastic Egyptian Sethian beliefs and practices . . . While Petrie’s discovery was of great significance he really didn’t appreciate nor understand it. Due to the unique practices of the “Sethians” he came to conclude they weren’t even Egyptians and hence saw them as some sort of foreign invaders. Due to this and the general ambivalence of Egyptologists to the figure of Seth, Petrie’s work in this field has remained largely untapped by later Egyptologists.

Morgan appreciating the significance of this unique resource with the eyes of a scholar as well as a magician has given us a glimpse of what the worshippers of Seth may have believed and praised. Moreover he shows the significance of these within a modern occult system, in his early work Tankhem: Seth & Egyptian Magick, he discussed how this system may have been originally Tantric in nature and its modern application. His research on the animals of Seth, images and names related to Seth, archaeological finds etc is extremely comprehensive and offers extensive clues which will take many years to fully explore and comprehend.

In Bull of Ombos: Seth and Egyptian Magick Voll II, he gives us quite an extensive intellectual framework for Sethian magick (including lots of source materials and some 78 illustrations) as well as giving us a means to bring the magick of Seth into our lives today. Living Traditions, Australia.

Recommended by The Cauldron #119

”I also want to personally thank you for your work . . . you have contributed to my practice and to my Coven’s rituals.’ – www.cotw.us, a teaching Coven, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Review in ASHÉ
“The publication of a book devoted to the Egyptian deity Seth (aka Set) is a rare enough event even in the rarified halls of academia. The publication of a modern magickal text focusing on Seth is even rarer. Despite the important role Seth played in the history of magick–his frequent appearances in the magical papyri of the Hermetic period–few modern texts have taken a serious look at the enigmatic god. This is not all too surprising, given the short-shrift and a good dose of bad PR both in antiquity and also in the Victorian mis-interpretations of the early Egyptologists. Two other modern texts come immediately to mind: Don Webb’s short treatise Seven Faces of Darkness and Mr. Morgan’s earlier work Tankhem. Mr. Morgan is an amateur Egyptologist who has long maintained and interest in the maligned figure of Seth. The Bull of Ombos begins with the 19th century discovery of an ancient city near Naqada, Egypt. The city proved to be the capital of the earliest Egyptian state. The lost city was known to the Greeks as Ombos, the Citadel of Seth. Once ruled by the Hidden God the site had been left to be swallowed by the sands of the desert–the image of the god transformed through later layers of Egyptian power and politics. As Mr. Morgan notes that most of the knowledge discovered at Ombos was quickly reburied in academic libraries. Bull of Ombos delves into these forbidden areas. Mr. Morgan painstakingly puts together the intricacies of early Sethian worship and the roll the god played in the Egyptians’ daily lives. He does not shy away from analyzing the more disturbing suggestions of previous archeological conclusions–even hints of cannibalism. From the scant clues available, the author has produced a detailed and intricate portrait of Seth that is at the same time very applicable to the modern Sethian. Mr. Morgan also provides retellings of the key Seth-related stories as appendix material–a welcome supplement to the text.”

Supernatural Assault
in Ancient Egypt
Seth, Renpet & Moon Magick
Mogg Morgan


Supernatural Assault in Ancient Egypt
Seth, Renpet & Moon Magick
Mogg Morgan
Format: Softcover
ISBN:
£11.99/US$22
Subjects: Egyptian Magick.

(New Edition 2011)
You’re in your bed. It’s dark, you hear footsteps coming up the stairs and into your room. There’s someone there – a presence. They lie on you or beside you, gripping you tightly, crushing you into the bed. You can’t move. There may be a sound, a grunt or a strange smell. Time passes, you are paralysed with fear. Eventually the entity changes, expanding or contracting, moving away from you, sinking to the floor. With a great effort of will you manage to move the tip of your finger, then the hand until movement returns to your whole body and the experience ends. You have been visited by the old ‘hag’.

Dreams, the real theatre or perhaps battlefield of magick, influenced by cosmic tides that ebb and flow through us as they did the ancient Egyptians.

Contents: Kiss of the Vampire / Origin of the Vampire Myth / Egyptian Psychology / Lucky and Unlucky / Supernatural Assault/

This Youtube link takes you to a little film that explores some of the issues in the book – check out the other films for more tidbits.

Tankhem
Seth & Egyptian Magick I
Mogg Morgan


Tankhem
Seth & Egyptian Magick I
Mogg Morgan
Format: Softcover
ISBN:
£10.99/US$22
Subjects: Egyptian Magick.

The Typhonian deity Seth was once worshipped in Ancient Egypt. Followers of later schools obliterated Seth’s monuments, demonised and neglected his cult. A possible starting point in the quest for the ‘hidden god’ is an examination of the life of Egyptian King Seti I (‘He of Seth’) also known as Sethos.

When looking for an astral temple that included all of the ancient Egyptian gods and goddesses, the temple of Seti I proved itself worthy of examination. Many secrets began to reveal themselves. The essence of the real philosophy of the Sethian and indeed what Satanism is, stems from the author’s astral wanderings in this temple.

The temple is a real place, and like any temple no part of its design is accidental. It is a record in stone and paint of the Egyptian wisdom. It also fits quite well with the Thelemic mythos and tells lots of interesting things about the ancient Seth cult – if you have the eye to see it.

 

Contents:

Prolegomena to Egyptian magick;

Setanism;

Tankhem;

Egyptian Magick and Tantra;

Sexual Magick;

Twenty Eight;

The Crooked Wand.

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Recommended by The Cauldron

THE VOICE OF THE STORM
“Considering how few modern metaphysical books are devoted to Sethian magic specifically, Storm initiates and other Sethians may find Morgan’s contribution to be of interest. Morgan also includes material relevant to the sexual mysticism of the left-hand path tradition which is relevant to the Storm’s transmission of the sinister current. Morgan’s approach is not in accordance with the purely religious vision of Seth that inspires the Storm movement (he seems to see Seth as a sort of Jungian archetype rather than a literal deity). Although we disagree with his connection of Seth to Satanism and Thelema, and some of his research in the book is dated (circa 1980s), many of Morgan’s insights and research concerning the historical cult of Seth will be illuminating to any reader interested in the Sethian phenomenon.’

SILVERSTAR
“A very personal exploration of the cult of the dark Egyptian god Set or Seth, covering ancient temples, tantrik and Crowleyan influences, sexual magick, sacred landscapes and astronomy, thought-forms, and the unjustly neglected work of the poet W.B. Yeats, who is seldom recognized as one of the most important and active members of the Golden Dawn. Mr. Morgan is an excellent example of how ancient magick can work for the modern individual: in exploring the past, you may find myths that resonate for you, that come alive in dreams and omens, appearing in unexpected synchronicities as you go through life. The Old Gods are not dead, they think we are. Mr. Morgan has also written several other works, including the thought-provoking Sexual Magick under the nom-de-plume Katon Shual.”