The Ritual Year in Ancient Egypt
Lunar & Solar
Calendars and Liturgy
Mogg Morgan



Format: Softcover/272 pp.
ISBN: 9781906958138
Subjects: Egyptian magic

The very oldest Egyptian ritual calendar was lunar. The evidence for this is very complex and in the words of Professor Leo Depuydt, “does not exactly jump out at you!” This ancient lunar calendar continued a veiled existence alongside the dominant solar or civil year. Many details are lost so the project of this book is to bring together what has survived. Revealed here is a very ancient pantheon of gods, including Set, Min, & Hathor, one for each month of the lunar year. I have provided for them a unique collection of liturgy, ritual and prayers as may have been offered in the homes, sanctuaries and temples of the original Egypt.

Many of these feasts of Ancient Egypt were celebrated on the phases of the moon – principally when it was new or full. So whatever your favorite god or goddess, make offerings on either of these days and you will be reviving an old and authentic form of the Ancient Egyptian magical religion.To complete the picture I present over several chapters all the technical details of the lunar month as well as its more well known civil replacement. Here you will find information on how certain key days were calculated when needed. These later chapters also provide related material on the mysteries of the Northern Constellations.

Finally there are descriptions of the thirty lunar days of each month and lunar omens. So in total this is the most complete and authoritative guide to the ritual wheel of the year at all stages of its use in the Ancient Egyptian magical religion.

Desert Fox Oracle



“The desert is so vast it can only be painted in miniature” Brion Gysin

The Desert Fox Oracle contains 30 cards. This number mirrors the number of days in the ancient Egyptian lunar calendar. The desert represents different things to different people. For example it can be the ultimate wilderness, the place of initiation and of the unconscious. The fox is the master of the desert and all its mysteries, he leads us on a journey through various archetypal images through which we can gain true knowledge of hidden things.

This is a prototype Limited Edition. A new box-set edition with companion book is under way. Stay tuned !


The Power of the Egyptian Gods
Mogg Morgan




Format: Softcover/228 pp.
ISBN: 978-1-906958-56-5
Subjects: Egyptian Magic

Phi-Neter, means ‘Power of the Gods’. In hieroglyphs this is represented by the hind-quarters of a leopard, a “Typhonian” creature, a predator who exemplifies the driving force of magick. In this book the author extends the core working material of Egyptian magick for himself and others to study and use. These techniques are manifest in the cult of Lord Seth – known as Typhon by the Greeks – and by all the other Gods of the Egyptian pantheon.

The Egyptian magician wields a power that was ultimately created by the Gods for the use of anyone who wishes to do their work. It is the same underlying power whether manipulated by Gods, priests, aristocrats, the common people or even the criminal. Same power, different ends.

“Ancient Egypt is an intellectual and spiritual world that is linked to our own by numerous strands of tradition.” – Jan Assmann, The Mind of Egypt

topics include: the false door; temple; abramelin; magick squares; aleister crowley; the heptagram; vowel song; cardinality; twilight language; seven charaktêres for “deliverance”; ring of power; hermeticism; colour symbolism; number; egyptian “kabbalah”; hermeneia; the star goddess; the book of nuit; ephemeris of egyptian decans; books of the nightworld (duat); book of gates; egyptian liturgy; a greco-egyptian dice oracle; Short Invocations, prayers, valedictions, maledictions etc


Mogg Morgan


Format: Softcover
ISBN: 978-1869928-421
Subjects: Tantra/Amookos

A ‘Sâdhana’ is an instrument that leads to a particular goal. In Tantra, it is a technical term denoting worship or spiritual practice.

Tantra Sâdhana is a collection of related instructional papers designed to aid the aspirant through a foundation practice.

The work was originally conceived as leading to a practice over the course of one lunar month. In addition, the author had added several useful appendices – including the previously unpublished Tantrik Knuckle Bone Oracle.

The reader might find this a good general primer combined with some more unusual, perhaps advanced material.


Introduction / / What is Tantra? / Sâdhana/practice / Mantra / Mandala or Yantra / MudrA / NyAsa / DhyAna / PUja / DIkshA / Magick and Liberation / Svecchacara / Tantrik traditions and sects / Recommended Reading / The opening rite / Yoga of the voice / Quarter Guardians / Visualisation / The Astral Temple / The Kamarupa Temple Meditation / The Kalas / The Ganesha Practice (Sadhana) / Ganesha rupa / The ‘Demon’ Doctrine and the roots of Tantra / Invocation of Kundalini / IV The Serpent Power /The Kaulajnana -Nirnaya of the School of Matsyendranath / Yoga Sutras of Patanjali / Grammar of Tantra / The VAma-keshvari-matam / Oracles / Tantrik Knuckle Bone Oracles / Pronounciation / When Your Guru Goes Gaga / Hindu Lunar Calendar

Review from White Dragon

“I first became interested in Tantra years ago when I read AGHORA, At the Left Hand of God by Robert E. Svoboda. The ideas of breaking out of social conditioning, becoming yourself, all appealed to me. Since then though my interest waned due to the New Age inundation of, ‘tantra for lovers’ type waffle.

Then comes Tantra Sadhana for me to review and I once again find myself inspired. This e-book takes the form of an introduction to the subject and then gives the reader some basic ritual to work through. First published as a fact-sheet for AMOOKOS, Arcane and Magickal Order of the Knights of Shamballa, so you know the information in chapter one is solid enough.

The inclusion of the Gnostic Pentagram Ritual was not to my taste, It’s a personal thing, but I would rather the author had used the version from the PGM, from which the GPR is a more rubbish version. I know why it’s there, but it didn’t work for me.

What I did find very useful was the extensive appendix, for me, this is the best part of the book, and with a little imagination can be used to form your own Tantric rites. I was very pleased to see the Ganapati Upanishad text included, I was at a private ritual years ago where Phil Hine did this and I found it very moving.

Anyone interested in Tantra beyond the New Age tripe will enjoy this book and I would recommend it without reservation. I would also say it’s worth reading for people interested in Chaos Magick, because reading it, it becomes obvious how Tantric ideas have shaped the Chaos Current that we have today. ”

Pan’s Road
Fiction complement to
The Bull of Ombos
Mogg Morgan

Format: Softcover
ISBN: 1869928-89x
Subjects: Occult Fiction/Egyptian Magic.

Fiction complement to THE BULL OF OMBOS

The ancient hungry stones of Coptos in Upper Egypt have soaked up the stories of the inhabitants along with their blood. When archaeologists unearth a magician’s box in the rubble of an ancient Egyptian tomb, it propels Jay into a supernatural journey across space and time. She merges with the mysterious Zenobia, a native of ancient Coptos. Zenobia and her family are fleeing from the advancing Roman armies that are returning to their Egyptian frontier bent on punishing its rebellious citizens. The only escape from the frying pan of Coptos is into the fire of the Eastern desert. Their journey on Pan’s Road is fraught with new dangers but also new possibilities, as the protagonists are led to the heart of an ancient mystery in the lost city of Ombos – Citadel of Seth, the Egyptian god of Chaos.

Thelemic Magick I
proceedings of the
Oxford Golden Dawn
Occult Society
Thelemic Symposium 1994
Mogg Morgan ed

Format: Softcover
ISBN: 186992844X
Subjects: Magick/Enochian Magick.

Contents include:

Stephen Ashe Short address on Liber Al and 50 gates of Babalon; Shantidevi Liber Samekh and Holy Guardian Angel Snoo Wilson, Aleister Crowley – Great Idea of the Twentieth Century Robert Ansell, Austin Spare- Life in Pictures (summary); Mick Staley The Mysteries of LAM; Steve Nicholls Enochian Magick; Dave Lee Cut-ups and Collages (summary); Jan Fries, Sound workshop (summary) MC Medusa, Invocation of Babalon.

The Bull of Ombos
Set and Egyptian Magick II
Mogg Morgan

Format: Softcover
Subjects: Egyptian Magick.

Naqada is a sleepy little town in Upper Egypt, that gives its name to a crucial period in the prehistory of Egypt. In 1895, William Matthew Flinders Petrie, the ‘father’ of Egyptian archaeology, stumbled upon a necropolis, belonging to a very ancient city of several thousand inhabitants. With Petrie’s usual luck, he’d made yet another archaeological find of seismic proportions – not just an ancient city a quarter the size of Ur in Mesopotamia, a rare enough find, but the capital of the earliest state established in Egypt! Petrie’s fateful walk through the desert led him to a lost city, known to the Greeks as Ombos, the Citadel of Seth. Seth, the Hidden God, once ruled in this ancient place before it was abandoned to the sands of the desert. All this forbidden knowledge was quickly reburied in academic libraries, where its stunning magical secrets had lain, largely unrevealed, for more than a century – until now.

This book is for all Egyptophiles as well as anyone with an interest in the archaic roots of magick and the sabbatic craft.

Contents: Gold in the desert / Sethians and Osirians compared / Cannibalism /Temple of Seth / Seth’s Town / Seth as Bull of Ombos / Hathor / The names of Seth / Animals of Seth / Seth – the red ochre god / Seth and Horus / Opening the mouth / Seven / The Boat / Heka & Hekau / Magical activities / Cakes of Light / Magick as use and misuse of the funeral rite / Re-emergence of the Hidden God / Five useful Appendices / Extended bibliography /Glossary


“The Bull of Ombos is an important and ground-breaking work. The figure of Set(h) has been of significance within Western magic for quite some time, even if he (it?) has appeared as the more controversial form of Satan. While the Temple of Set and The Storm have pioneered research into Sethian magick, the works of Mogg Morgan stand alone as major contributions to this field. What I find most unique is that they combine the fastidiousness of an Egyptologist with the experience of a modern occultist. Certainly Morgan knows his stuff, from Tantra to the modern O.T.O. from pagan and Left Hand Path magick to the Golden Dawn and traditional folklore and customs, but at the same time he approaches the subject cautiously and with the skills of a scholar even a folklorist.

What he offers in this work is what could be best described as a reconstruction of pre-dynastic Egyptian Sethian beliefs and practices . . . While Petrie’s discovery was of great significance he really didn’t appreciate nor understand it. Due to the unique practices of the “Sethians” he came to conclude they weren’t even Egyptians and hence saw them as some sort of foreign invaders. Due to this and the general ambivalence of Egyptologists to the figure of Seth, Petrie’s work in this field has remained largely untapped by later Egyptologists.

Morgan appreciating the significance of this unique resource with the eyes of a scholar as well as a magician has given us a glimpse of what the worshippers of Seth may have believed and praised. Moreover he shows the significance of these within a modern occult system, in his early work Tankhem: Seth & Egyptian Magick, he discussed how this system may have been originally Tantric in nature and its modern application. His research on the animals of Seth, images and names related to Seth, archaeological finds etc is extremely comprehensive and offers extensive clues which will take many years to fully explore and comprehend.

In Bull of Ombos: Seth and Egyptian Magick Voll II, he gives us quite an extensive intellectual framework for Sethian magick (including lots of source materials and some 78 illustrations) as well as giving us a means to bring the magick of Seth into our lives today. Living Traditions, Australia.

Recommended by The Cauldron #119

”I also want to personally thank you for your work . . . you have contributed to my practice and to my Coven’s rituals.’ –, a teaching Coven, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Review in ASHÉ
“The publication of a book devoted to the Egyptian deity Seth (aka Set) is a rare enough event even in the rarified halls of academia. The publication of a modern magickal text focusing on Seth is even rarer. Despite the important role Seth played in the history of magick–his frequent appearances in the magical papyri of the Hermetic period–few modern texts have taken a serious look at the enigmatic god. This is not all too surprising, given the short-shrift and a good dose of bad PR both in antiquity and also in the Victorian mis-interpretations of the early Egyptologists. Two other modern texts come immediately to mind: Don Webb’s short treatise Seven Faces of Darkness and Mr. Morgan’s earlier work Tankhem. Mr. Morgan is an amateur Egyptologist who has long maintained and interest in the maligned figure of Seth. The Bull of Ombos begins with the 19th century discovery of an ancient city near Naqada, Egypt. The city proved to be the capital of the earliest Egyptian state. The lost city was known to the Greeks as Ombos, the Citadel of Seth. Once ruled by the Hidden God the site had been left to be swallowed by the sands of the desert–the image of the god transformed through later layers of Egyptian power and politics. As Mr. Morgan notes that most of the knowledge discovered at Ombos was quickly reburied in academic libraries. Bull of Ombos delves into these forbidden areas. Mr. Morgan painstakingly puts together the intricacies of early Sethian worship and the roll the god played in the Egyptians’ daily lives. He does not shy away from analyzing the more disturbing suggestions of previous archeological conclusions–even hints of cannibalism. From the scant clues available, the author has produced a detailed and intricate portrait of Seth that is at the same time very applicable to the modern Sethian. Mr. Morgan also provides retellings of the key Seth-related stories as appendix material–a welcome supplement to the text.”

Supernatural Assault
in Ancient Egypt
Seth, Renpet & Moon Magick
Mogg Mirgan

Format: Softcover
Subjects: Egyptian Magick.

(New Edition 2011)
You’re in your bed. It’s dark, you hear footsteps coming up the stairs and into your room. There’s someone there – a presence. They lie on you or beside you, gripping you tightly, crushing you into the bed. You can’t move. There may be a sound, a grunt or a strange smell. Time passes, you are paralysed with fear. Eventually the entity changes, expanding or contracting, moving away from you, sinking to the floor. With a great effort of will you manage to move the tip of your finger, then the hand until movement returns to your whole body and the experience ends. You have been visited by the old ‘hag’.

Dreams, the real theatre or perhaps battlefield of magick, influenced by cosmic tides that ebb and flow through us as they did the ancient Egyptians.

Contents: Kiss of the Vampire / Origin of the Vampire Myth / Egyptian Psychology / Lucky and Unlucky / Supernatural Assault/

This Youtube link takes you to a little film that explores some of the issues in the book – check out the other films for more tidbits.

Mogg Morgan


I work for innovative ‘new edge’ publisher Mandrake of Oxford, recently described as a ‘respected literary catalyst’, and responsible for the discovery of many new authors, including his friend and onetime mentor Jan Fries.

I regard myself as a practitioner-cum-scholar of all aspects of occultism. I was a Wellcome research student at Oxford, where my teacher was the late Professor B K Matilal, a widely respected expert on South Asian thought. Over the years I have been exploring the connections between the popular magick of ancient Egypt and its continuation/crossover with the living magical traditions of the middle East, and the Kaula/witchcraft of south Asia and beyond

I have a particular interest in divination, dream interpretation and oracles. I’ve experimented widely in using some ancient oracles to address modern queries. Consequently I do sometimes prepare “horoscopes” in the original and authentic Egyptian manner. I also use dice oracles based on Greco-Egyptian and Tantrik sources. I interpret dreams and other omens. My direct email (mandox2000[@]

Books, Ebooks, Bonus Essays, Lectures, Misc

Isis In India
Work In Progress – Research into the survival of the cult of Isis in South India.
Ebook available on Isis In India

House of Life
A set of introductory magical exercises designed to complement Tankhem & The Bull of Ombos. Available free from House of Life

Strange Oxford
Updated ebook version of now out of print guide to local legends, ancient sites, folklore, magic and mystery on Kindle Ebook

Lectures & Podcasts (available for booking)

Discussion of Egyptian Magick Podcast (click on link)

Art & the Occult

Cult of the Hidden God

Egyptian Magick – General Introduction

Isis In India

Lunar Mysteries of Seth

Seth: personification of evil?
Abstract: Contemporary magical practitioners have always been interested in the ‘problem of evil’ – the nature of good and bad action. Take for example Helena Blavatsky’s statement – ‘demon est deus inversus’ to be found in her highly influential and monument work ‘The Secret Doctrine’ (1888:1.411). This was later adopted by the poet W B Yeats as his magical motto in the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. Most practitioners believe that the ancient Egyptian god Seth is the prototype for the contemporary archetype of Lucifer, Satan or the Devil. I want to take a brief look, in context, at the famous image of Seth deriding Apophis, (the demonic / chaotic serpent of ‘non-being’) as a leitmotiv for the nature or ‘personification’ of evil in ancient thought.

View a short film on Typhonian Magick:

Seething & Seidr (workshop)

Sexuality & Magick

Write & Find Ecstasy in writing: occult writing after the Witchcraft Act

Set & Egyptian Magick I
Mogg Morgan

Format: Softcover
Subjects: Egyptian Magick.

The Typhonian deity Seth was once worshipped in Ancient Egypt. Followers of later schools obliterated Seth’s monuments, demonised and neglected his cult. A possible starting point in the quest for the ‘hidden god’ is an examination of the life of Egyptian King Seti I (‘He of Seth’) also known as Sethos.

When looking for an astral temple that included all of the ancient Egyptian gods and goddesses, the temple of Seti I proved itself worthy of examination. Many secrets began to reveal themselves. The essence of the real philosophy of the Sethian and indeed what Satanism is, stems from the author’s astral wanderings in this temple.

The temple is a real place, and like any temple no part of its design is accidental. It is a record in stone and paint of the Egyptian wisdom. It also fits quite well with the Thelemic mythos and tells lots of interesting things about the ancient Seth cult – if you have the eye to see it.



Prolegomena to Egyptian magick;



Egyptian Magick and Tantra;

Sexual Magick;

Twenty Eight;

The Crooked Wand.


Recommended by The Cauldron

“Considering how few modern metaphysical books are devoted to Sethian magic specifically, Storm initiates and other Sethians may find Morgan’s contribution to be of interest. Morgan also includes material relevant to the sexual mysticism of the left-hand path tradition which is relevant to the Storm’s transmission of the sinister current. Morgan’s approach is not in accordance with the purely religious vision of Seth that inspires the Storm movement (he seems to see Seth as a sort of Jungian archetype rather than a literal deity). Although we disagree with his connection of Seth to Satanism and Thelema, and some of his research in the book is dated (circa 1980s), many of Morgan’s insights and research concerning the historical cult of Seth will be illuminating to any reader interested in the Sethian phenomenon.’

“A very personal exploration of the cult of the dark Egyptian god Set or Seth, covering ancient temples, tantrik and Crowleyan influences, sexual magick, sacred landscapes and astronomy, thought-forms, and the unjustly neglected work of the poet W.B. Yeats, who is seldom recognized as one of the most important and active members of the Golden Dawn. Mr. Morgan is an excellent example of how ancient magick can work for the modern individual: in exploring the past, you may find myths that resonate for you, that come alive in dreams and omens, appearing in unexpected synchronicities as you go through life. The Old Gods are not dead, they think we are. Mr. Morgan has also written several other works, including the thought-provoking Sexual Magick under the nom-de-plume Katon Shual.”